The Cover Up Novel by Ken David Stewart Part 43


Next Scene:
Lisa Harrison started to address her creative writing class.

“The next thing that I want to find out about is your tastes in reading material. The love of reading and books and the love of writing usually go hand in hand. Mr. Stephens, would you mind getting tonight’s discussion started by introducing yourself to the group and telling us about your reading habits?” asked Lisa Harrison.

“No problem. Hi people. My name is Drake Stephens and I’m a rehabilitation worker at The House of Hope. I started reading when I was just a young kid. I still remember walking to the local drugstore to buy those Classic Illustrated comic books. They would have condensed versions of classic literature such as Treasure Island.”

Yeah, I remember those,” said Bill James. Those comics were cool. I loved the art work in them. They smelled good too.”

When Bill said this, several class participants started to laugh and one yelled out. “He’s right. The smell of the books is one of the great pleasures of reading them.”

“Okay, Mr. Stephens, what kinds of books do you read now? Who are your favorite authors?” asked Lisa Harrison attempting to get the discussion back on track.

“Well, I’d have to say, Stephen King, for one,” answered Drake.

“And what do you like about Stephen King’s writing?” asked the facilitator.

“ His books scare the crap out of me!” offered an elderly lady sitting near the back of the room. She was nibbling on a cheese sandwich that she brought from home.
“Surprisingly enough, it’s not the spooky stuff that draws me to Stephen King’s books,” said Drake sitting back in his chair and putting his hands behind his head.

“I know what you mean, Drake. I like the way Stephen King characterizes every day ordinary people,” said Bill James.

“You’re right Bill and I like the way King makes his characters seem so real. After awhile you feel like you know them in real life,” said Drake.

“Well, class, I think that Drake and Bill have made a significant point, the importance of creating believable characters,” said Lisa Harrison.

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