Category: creativity

Episode 5 of The Fall and Rise of Harold Peyton


Episode 5:

Harold watched after the Ford 150 drove away. He stood and stared at the young woman and started to think what he was going to do about her. Harold didn’t even consider calling the police. Instead he opened the front door of his house and called loudly to the girl in distress.

“Come here young lady. You need to get out of the cold or you’ll freeze to death!”

The young female looked towards Harold with a confused and frightened look. She wiped the snowflakes off her hoodie and walked awkwardly towards the door that Harold was holding open for her.

“Thank you so much Mister. You may have saved my life. May I come in your house?

“Step into the living room and make yourself at home,” Harold replied.

“Thanks. Hey, I should introduce myself. My name is Whisper,” the strange young woman said as she found a place to sit on Harold’s yellow and orange patterned sofa. Whisper admired the brass antique lamp to the left of the sofa. The full décor of Harold Peyton’s living room had the ambiance that could only come from a man who appreciated fine art.

“Could I interest you in a cup of Tim Horton’s coffee or perhaps a mug of hot chocolate?” Harold asked. “By the way, Whisper is a beautiful name. Who gave you that name?”

“My grandma came up with it if I remember correctly,” Whisper replied.
While standing in the hall, Harold now had a good opportunity to observe Whisper. Her hair was blonde highlighted by orange streaks. It presently looked wet and tangled. There were still some snowflakes in her hair. Whisper’s make up was smudged and smeared from her tears. Harold thought that Whisper resembled a naughty, terribly neglected little elf. She was not very attractive and was slightly overweight giving her a pudgy look.fantasy 21

Infinite Realities Episode Sixteen


Episode Sixteen of Infinite Realities:

“What are your books about?” asked the industrial psychologist.

“Nothing- and everything,” Rick said.

“That doesn’t make sense. What do you mean by nothing and everything?”

“That’s a good question,” Rick began. “I’m not sure that I completely understand the writing process. Especially mine. I guess it could be described as some form of stream of consciousness writing like James Joyce used in The Portrait of a the Artist as a Young Man.

I find it very difficult to envision or to plan out my books before I write them. I suppose I use the fly by the seat of my pants approach. I am definitely not a plotter nor a planner. On most days I have a burning desire to write something. I have a great need to spill out the ideas that are in my head on any given day. I like to get up early in the morning around four or five AM. I have my Frosted Flakes and coffee for breakfast and then I sit down at my word processor and begin to write. I usually find it to be a very enjoyable experience. I find it to be more efficacious for my mental health than talking to my therapist. No offense to my psychiatrist. I believe that she sincerely wants to help me put my fragmented psyche back together and to get me back to work.

In my opinion writing is much like talking to yourself. The writer pulls down to earth some of the fascinating ideas that are buzzing around in the universe and transfers them to paper as best as he can. The hard work comes when you get near the end of the first draft. That’s when I try to find some organic unity in what I have written. I look for a unifying theme and start the painful process of deciding what to keep and what to throw out. Sometimes I have to give up the whole novel if I find that there isn’t anything that I can do to save it.”

“That sounds like hard work,” said Michael who at one time had aspirations of writing his own novel.

 

 

fantasy 16

Chapter 116 of the Lake Demon


Chapter One Hundred Sixteen:
“Plan A goes into action as soon as we get the model loaded on the truck in the wee hours tomorrow morning. After we get our wooden friend into the truck we’re going to take it out to a very secluded part of the lake. The place I have in mind has a lot of trees, bushes and other vegetation surrounding it. Due to the early hour of the day it will be very dark and it is doubtful that anyone will see us unloading our treasure from the truck. Just in case, however, we will keep a close lookout for any potential bystanders.
I will hire a couple of guys I know that have powerful portable lighting devices and know how to use them. I will also take along some high grade flashlights so that we don’t stumble on our way to the path to the lake,” said Jack.
“So you’re planning to take some pictures of my replica in the lake?” asked Mike.
“Yes, but not only clear, crisp photos. I want to shoot some video of a high quality also. I know that you have some high end video equipment in your apartment, Mike. You are going to be our official photographer and camera man,” answered Jack.
“Don’t worry. You will be handsomely rewarded for your efforts.”
“I’m very willing to help you with this project, Jack but with my health challenges and mobility issues I don’t know how I’m going to be able to get down to the shore of the lake,” said Mike with a feeling of embarrassment and shame that only the disabled know.
“I’m always a step ahead of you Mike. You are this project’s artist and audio visual technician, but I am the project manager. I’ve thought of everything. I hired four huge body builder guys I recruited at a local fitness club. If worst comes to worst, these men can carry you down to the lake. I’m also bringing along a very sturdy wheel chair I bought at a medical supply store. With the help of my four strong men we may be able to get you down to the lake front by means of the wheel chair,” said Jack.
“I have to hand it to you, Jack. You are a brilliant planner and tactician,” said Mike who was greatly in awe of his friend’s skill set.
“You sure must want to make a fool of Blake Riley. You aren’t sparing any effort or expense to make your little scam work,” said Mike.
“You are one hundred percent right about that,” said Jack.l m 3

The Indie Writer’s Corner Episode 2


The Indie Writer’s Corner Episode 2
When I started to see writing as having the potential to generate income, my whole attitude towards writing changed. I learned that I would have to take it more seriously. Somewhere along the line it started to dawn on me that writing is an art form in which I would need to learn the craft.
To learn the craft takes both time and a lot of study. Most people cannot become successful writers without learning the trade and studying the techniques and strategies of the writing process.
When I first started writing a few years ago I just assumed that because I read a lot, I would intuitively know how to write fiction. This turned out to be only partially true. To become good at writing one must read a lot and write a lot. This is what Stephen King says in his book, On Writing. I don’t think that anyone can argue with Mr. King’s commercial success although a few of the unenlightened have questioned his artistic abilities. Personally, I have enjoyed reading Stephen King’s work for decades. I used to read his novels, novellas and short stories for pure entertainment. Now I am re-reading many of Stephen King’s novels with the goal of trying to figure out how he writes so well. There is real value in this approach but the aspiring writing must use other strategies beside this one.
By the way, I’ve come to hate the term aspiring writer. If you write either fiction or non-fiction on a regular basis start calling yourself a writer even if you haven’t published anything or made any money yet. We shall meet again for episode 3 of The Indie Writer’s Corner. If you like to comment on this blog or share some of your own insights on indie writing please email your comments to kendavid stewart7@gmail.com. I would like to see this blog turn into an interactive forum for indie writers.
Keep on writing,
Ken David Stewart
2014-11-26 13-14-11.636

Jack Plans for Revenge


Chapter One Hundred Six:
As Jack gave Mike his coffee he began answering Mike’s question.
“There’s a couple of ways we could go with this once your life sized model of Ogopogo is built. One idea I have is to take the replica out to the lake and hire someone start snapping pictures of it. Then I will anonymously mail these photos of the fake Ogopogo to Blake Riley. I will include a letter that says that I am a tourist who happened to see the lake monster on Lake Okanagan and started taking pictures of it. The tourist will write that he took these pictures near Squally Point. When the time is right I will make up another letter from the tourist to the Vancouver Sun. The letter will be addressed to Bobby O’Connor and will state that the photos were fakes. I will wait until Blake has sent these pictures to Bobby claiming that he took them himself. This will prove to the world that Blake is both a liar and a fraud.
I also have another plan in mind. I will hire somebody to phone Blake and tell him to immediately get to a certain location on the lake. The caller will state that he has been watching the lake demon for about ten minutes now. Blake won’t waste any time getting his boat and crew out to the specified location. Meanwhile, I will have hired a couple of divers to manoeuvre your model beneath the surface. Blake will be sure to take a ton of pictures that he will once again send to the Vancouver Sun. I have no doubt that Blake and his crew will even try to capture the phony lake monster, but I will tell my divers to submerge the model and get it out of Blake’s sight.
If Blake’s crew does manage to capture artificial Ogopogo I will have my own video crew nearby to film the look of shock on Blake’s face when he discovers that the Ogopogo he caught is a carved, wooden model. I will then send this video to Bobby O’Connor at the Vancouver Sun. This time Blake will look like a gullible fool.”
“You sure want to get revenge on Blake Riley, don’t you Jack?” stated Mike.
“With every fibre in my being,” Jack answered.

l m 3

The Writing Process (Part Seven)


The Writing Process (Part Seven)
This weekend I have been receiving a lot of requests to review my peers’ writing on Figment. I’m starting to feel like the go to guy for story and book reviews. Most of the aspiring authors on Figment are young people. I am gratified to know how many youth are getting involved in the art and craft of writing. It is a pleasure to read and review their work and I am learning a great deal in the process.
2012-07-20 16-55-55.135