Category: treatment of severe and chronic mental illness

Episode 188 (The Conclusion) of The Lake Demon by Ken David Stewart


Episode One Hundred Eighty-Eight (Conclusion):
The Harbor Patrol arrived and managed to transport the maimed diver to the closest hospital but unfortunately, the man died at the hospital. By this time Bobby O’Conner had found out about the aborted mission to capture a live Ogopogo. Before conducting his interviews with the key participants the veteran reporter decided that he would do the right thing and would inform William Everett, the head of the Fisheries Department and Sheriff George Anderson of the day’s events. Bobby figured that if he didn’t the Harbor Patrol surely would and he wanted to say on good terms with the authorities.
The major leaders of the expeditions collectively agreed to call a halt to their investigations. On talking it over at an undisclosed meeting sight, Blake Riley, Jack Kimberly, Dr. Lionel Hardy and Winston Standfield came to the conclusion that it was too dangerous to continue their mission to capture a live Ogopogo. They all felt that the human cost was too high to proceed any further at this point. They also knew that they would have to wait to find out if criminal charges were to be brought against any of the expeditions’ participants. They agreed that their mission was not a complete failure. A preponderance of new research data had been collected and the photographic and video evidence all pointed to the proof of Ogopogo’s existence.
John and Susan Richards decided to go out for coffee to discuss how recent events were going to effect their relationship. They both concluded that they should end their separation and give their marriage another chance. The decision on where to live was settled at a Richards family meeting. Ryan and Monique shared that they wanted to continue living in Kelowna as they both wanted to pursue their academic studies at The University of British Columbia. Stephanie informed her family that she too, wished to reside permanently on Kelowna as she wanted to continue her relationship with Garry Hardy.
Wally Standfield and Garry Hardy both decided that they would return to The Kelowna Mental Health Center to complete their therapeutic programs. Upon graduation, Winston Standfield suggested that the two young men should live with him.
As for the Ogopogo family, legislation was passed that ruled that any future research projects that involved either searching for or attempting to capture the creatures would be declared illegal.ogopogo 33

Excerpt 98 from The Lake Demon


Chapter Ninety-Eight
Garry Hardy invited Stephanie Richards over to secluded wooden bench just in front of a large oak tree. The demonstration had pretty much fizzled out by this time. The prospective hunters appear to have heard the sheriff’s zero tolerance message loud and clear. There wouldn’t be any danger done to Ogopogo on Sheriff George Anderson’s watch.
As they watched the last group of people get into their vehicles and leave the town commons, Garry and Stephanie started up a conversation. Stephanie was the first to ask a question.
“So, where are you from Garry?
“Originally I’m from Winnipeg. I was coming to Kelowna to visit my aunt and uncle, but my plans kind of fell through,” Garry answered.
“How did your plans fall through?” Stephanie asked.
“It’s kind of complicated,” Garry said.
“I don’t know if I should get into that with you. If I tell you the truth it could make you afraid of me or at least you’ll think I’m pretty weird and that you probably shouldn’t be hanging out with me.”
“What are you trying to tell me? That you killed or injured someone or that you just got out of jail?” asked Stephanie.
“It’s not that bad.” Garry replied.
Stephanie turned around and looked Garry straight in the eye. “Look Garry Hardy. I’m a very strong person and I’ve also had some issues in my life. You can trust me. I’m very good at keeping confidences,”
As Garry began to talk, Stephanie gently put her left hand on Garry’s arm.
“This is not going to be easy for me to tell you, Steph. Do you mind if I call you Steph?” asked Garry.
Stephanie laughed. “All of my family and all my friends call me Steph, so I don’t see why you shouldn’t. Besides I have the feeling that we are going to be very good friends. I feel very comfortable being with you already.”
“Okay. Here goes.” Garry’s voice was already starting to crack. I have schizophrenia and at times it gets me into a lot of trouble. That’s why I didn’t get to visit my aunt and uncle. Do you know what a psychotic break is?”
“Yes, only too well. I had one myself a little over a year ago,” Stephanie replied.
“You’re kidding! What happened?” Garry asked.
“I haven’t been diagnosed with schizophrenia like you. I have a different diagnosis. I have depression with psychotic features. This means that I occasionally have episodes of depression that are so severe that I lose touch with reality.”
“Wow! I think we are going to become very good friends,” Garry said.
“So. Tell me your story. What happened to derail your plans for visiting your aunt and uncle?” Stephanie asked.
“It all started in Winnipeg when I stopped taking my medications. I have always hated my medications and their side effects. The problem is, when I go off them for a few days, bad things happen. I see things that no one else sees, I hear sounds that nobody else does. I even smell things that no one else smells. When I go off my meds some people start looking to me like reptilian creatures including my parents. Only my father is still alive but when my mother was alive she, too, would look reptilian to me from time to time. I came to believe that my parents had the ability to change at will between their human and reptilian forms.”
“I have read quite a few books on schizophrenia and I remember reading that when a person has hallucinations and delusions they seem so real that they wonder why no one else can see them. They also can’t understand why no one else believes what they tell them,” Stephanie said.
“Exactly. That is absolutely true,” Garry said. “This is what all went down. I was staying at a psychiatric treatment facility in Winnipeg. I decided that it was time I got off my meds because I had no energy and no real motivation to even take a shower. So I started cheeking my meds for a few days.
My next move was to go AWOL. I had just received that month’s welfare cheque and I decided that I would take a Greyhound bus to Kelowna to visit my aunt and uncle. For some reason I thought that they would believe my story about my father being reptilian. When I got on the bus I started to see many of the passengers turn into their reptilian forms. I panicked and went up to the bus driver to let him know about the other passengers. The next thing I recalled was taking a severe beating by a big, burly man. I don’t remember too much after that until I found out I was in the Kelowna Mental Health Center.
“Wow! That was quite the ordeal. The next thing I want to know is if you are back on your meds now,” Stephanie said.
“Oh yes. I am. I’m feeling very stable right now. I think my new psychiatrist has me on the right meds and the correct dosage.”
“So why did you go AWOL from this treatment center?” Stephanie asked.
“Oh, I’m not AWOL. I got an extended pass to be out for two weeks. My rehabilitation counsellor phones me every two days to make sure that I’m alright. So far, so good.”
“You were telling me about a man named Winston and an expedition that you had joined,” Stephanie said.
“Winston Stanfield is my friend Wally’s grandfather. I met Wally at the mental health center and I got very interested in his stories about his grandfather. When Wally got permission for a weekend pass to visit his grandfather I asked if I could come along. Wally thought it was a great idea and I also got permission to go. Winston has been taking us out on his cabin cruiser to search for Ogopogo. I’ll tell you what. If you’re not busy now we can walk over to Winston’s place right now,” Garry said.20150914_114904[1]

Excerpt 66 from The lake Demon by Ken David Stewart


Chapter Sixty-Six
After Smackdown ended Winston made some more popcorn and offered the boys some more pop and popcorn. The conversation switched to the topic of mental health and life in psychiatric treatment facilities.
“The whole mental health system in North America is a disaster. The present system simply does not work. The only people it benefits are those who have important sounding job titles working in government bureaucracies,” Winston stated, pounding his fist on the coffee table. “From what I’ve heard, though, the Kelowna Mental Health Center is one of the better run mental health facilities in Canada.”
“That’s true,” Wally said.
“The front line rehabilitation staff is really cool and they know what they’re doing.”
“I have to agree with Wally,” Garry added. Our rehab workers, Todd and Shelly really seem to care about us and our psychiatrist, Dr. Weisenthall is also very good.”
“Well then, you guys are in the fortunate group of mental health consumers that are getting adequate treatment for their mental health issues. Many people with mental disorders, especially those with schizophrenia, simply fall through the cracks of the mental health system. A lot of them either end up homeless, in prison or are forced into living in filthy, cockroach and rat infested hotel rooms or old broken down rooming houses.”
“Nobody cares. That’s the whole problem,” Wally said.
“You’re right, Wally, but there are a minority of people who do care, but these are usually the underpaid and underappreciated front line workers.”
“Do you think that this situation will ever change?” Garry asked Winston.

“No, there are too many institutions, corporations and individuals who are benefiting financially from the way the system operates now.”
“This conversation is getting really depressing,” Wally said. “I’m getting really tired. Why don’t we call it a night?”
Winston said, “You’re right.
Let’s all get a little shut eye.
We’ve got lot of things to do tomorrow.”
Wally found two air mattresses and inflated them properly with a hand pump. The two young men were both very tired and fell asleep quickly.
In the morning the boys awoke to the enticing aroma of the bacon and eggs that Winston was cooking for them.
After consuming a hearty and delicious breakfast and a pot of coffee, Winston suggested that it was time to go for a boat ride.
“I was going to take you guys for a ride in my speedboat but on further consideration I decided we’d go for a ride on my big cabin cruiser. I’ve got a lot of brand new, cutting edge technology on the big boat that I’d like to show you guys. fantasy 6

Chapter 114 of the Lake Demon


Chapter One Hundred Fourteen:
Garry Phelge invited Stephanie Richards over to secluded wooden bench just in front of a large oak tree. The demonstration had pretty much fizzled out by this time. The prospective hunters appear to have heard the sheriff’s zero tolerance message loud and clear. There wouldn’t be any danger done to Ogopogo on Sheriff George Anderson’s watch.
As they watched the last group of people get into their vehicles and leave the town commons, Garry and Stephanie started up a conversation. Stephanie was the first to ask a question.
“So, where are you from Garry?
“Originally I’m from Winnipeg. I was coming to Kelowna to visit my aunt and uncle but my plans kind of fell through,”
answered Garry.
“How did your plans fall through?” asked Stephanie.
“It’s kind of complicated,” said Garry.
“I don’t know if I should get into that with you. If I tell you the truth it could make you afraid of me or at least you’ll think I’m pretty weird and that you shouldn’t be hanging out with me.”
“What are you trying to tell me? That you killed or injured someone or that you just got out of jail?”
“It’s not that bad.”
Stephanie turned around and looked Garry straight in the eye. “Look Garry Phelge. I’m a very strong person and I’ve also had some issues in my life. You can trust me. I’m very good at keeping confidences,”
As Garry began to talk, Stephanie gently put her left hand on Garry’s arm.
“This is not going to be easy for me to tell you, Steph. Do you mind if I call you Steph?” Stephanie laughed. “All of my family and all my friends call me Steph so I don’t see why you shouldn’t. Besides I have the feeling that we are going to be very good friends. I feel very comfortable being with you already.”
“Okay. Here goes.” Garry’s voice was already starting to crack. I have schizophrenia and at times it gets me into a lot of trouble. That’s why I didn’t get to visit my aunt and uncle. Do you know what a psychotic break is?”
“Yes, only too well. I had one myself a little over a year ago,” answered Stephanie.
“You’re kidding! What happened?” asked Garry.
“I haven’t been diagnosed with schizophrenia like you have. I have a different diagnosis. I have depression with psychotic features. This means that I occasionally have episodes of depression that are so severe that I lose touch with reality.”
“Wow! I think we are going to become good friends,” said Garry.
“So. Tell me your story. What happened to derail your plans for visiting your aunt and uncle?” asked Stephanie.
“It all started in Winnipeg when I stopped taking my medications. I have always hated my medications and their side effects. The problem is, when I go off them for a few days, bad things happen. I see things that no one else sees, I hear sounds that nobody else does. I even smell things that no one else smells. When I go off my meds some people start looking to me like reptilian creatures including my parents. Only my father is still alive but when my mother was alive she, too, would look reptilian to me from time to time. I came to believe that my parents had the ability to change at will between their human and reptilian forms.”
“I have read quite a few books on schizophrenia and I remember reading that when a person has hallucinations and delusions they seem so real that they wonder why no one else can see them. They also can’t understand why no one else believes what they tell them,” said Stephanie.
“Exactly. That is absolutely true,” said Garry. “This what all went down. I was staying at a psychiatric treatment facility in Winnipeg. I decide that it was time I got off my meds because I had no energy and no real motivation to even take a shower. So I started cheeking my meds for a few days. My next move was to go AWOL. I had just received that month’s welfare cheque and I decided that I would take a Greyhound bus to Kelowna to visit my aunt and uncle. For some reason I thought that they would believe my story about my father being reptilian. When I got on the bus I started to see many of the passengers turn into their reptilian forms. I panicked and went up to the bus driver to let him know about the other passengers. The next thing I recalled was taking a severe beating by a big, burly man. I don’t remember too much after that until I found out I was in the Kelowna Mental Health Center.
“Wow, that was quite the ordeal. The next thing I want to know is if you are back on your meds now,” said Stephanie.
“Oh yes I am. I’m feeling very stable right now. I think my new psychiatrist has me on the right meds and the correct dosage.”
“So why did you go AWOL from this treatment center?” asked Stephanie.
“Oh, I’m not AWOL. I got an extended pass to be out for two weeks. My rehabilitation counsellor phones me every two days to make sure that I’m alright. So far, so good.”
“You were telling me about a man named Winston and an expedition that you had joined,” said Stephanie.
“Winston Stanfield is my friend Wally’s grandfather. I met Wally at the mental health center and I got very interested in his stories about his grandfather. When Wally got permission for a weekend pass to visit his grandfather I asked if I could come along. Wally thought it was a great idea and I also got permission to go. Winston has been taking us out on his cabin cruiser to search for Ogopogo. I’ll tell you what. If you’re not busy now we can walk over to Winston’s place right now,” said Garry.m 1

Ken David Stewart’s Greatest Hits (Volume 1 Excerpt 16)


In under five minutes four paramedics arrived on the scene. The paramedics in this city were very familiar with this facility and the surrounding neighborhood. It was not unusual for emergency personnel to pay ten to twenty visits per week to this facility. Many of the calls they received were, in
essence, false alarms. When the paramedics arrived at the scene they would
often find that the client was very intoxicated with either alcohol, drugs, or both being the culprit. Other times they would be called out due to a client complaining of being short of breath and or having chest pain. Other occasions the calls would be for residents experiencing anxiety attacks or going into psychosis. Two years ago they had been called to the scene for an actual fatal stabbing incident.
A young blond female paramedic in her twenties and her handsome young male partner were the first to attend to the resident in the stairwell.
“He’s not breathing and I’m not getting a pulse,” the female paramedic said to her co-worker.
“He’s feeling stiff and cold to to the touch,” added her male colleague.
Just then a young police constable and his senior partner arrived on the scene.
“How’s the man doing?” asked the younger police officer.
“He’s dead,” the male paramedic answered. “He has numerous contusions on his body and his neck could possibly be broken as a result of a fall or a push.”
“The medical examiner will need to determine the exact cause of death. I’ll call for the detectives,” the senior constable said to his young partner.
Within ten minutes a big , burly detective in his early fifties named Jeff Barnes arrived with his partner, Krista Holland, a trim, attractive, strawberry blond, female detective.
As all this was happening, the security guard, Jim Bellows, had called a code blue for the building. This meant that all available staff who were available were to respond to the site of the incident. The first residential care worker to arrive at the scene was a tall, thin woman in her late forties. She was instructed to stay where she was by the male detective.
After a brief introduction to each other Constable Redding asked the residential care worker to round up the rest of the staff of the facility and have them wait in the staff room until the detectives were ready for them.
The second staff to arrive at the scene was Rick Jennings, the mental health wing supervisor. Rick was a good looking, physically fit man who had just turned forty. He quickly identified himself to the detectives. When Rick asked what had happened, the female detective, Krista Holland, told Rick to wait in the staff room but not before informing the supervisor that a resident of the facility was dead.
The body of the deceased resident was taken to the city morgue after the
detectives had taken pictures of him and had taken notes on what the resident
was wearing and to make a record of any belongings found in his clothing.
After approximately fifteen minutes the two detectives went to the staff room on the second floor to talk to the staff of the facility.
The House of Hope was a four floor building that housed approximately seventy residents. It was the brain child of the government’s Health Division and was considered to be state of the art. There were two main treatment facilities located in the building. The fourth floor contained the substance abuse treatment center. The third floor was a rehabilitation unit for clients presenting with severe and chronic psychiatric disabilities. The second floor was for female residents that had previously been homeless or were escaping from abusive relationships and the first floor was occupied by impoverished men who didn’t have a safe and permanent place to live in the community. The administrators of The House of Hope were very proud of their building as it purported to meet so many divergent needs in the poorest area of the city. When a first time visitor came to The Center, they would first notice the offensive odor that only chronic and severe poverty can produce. There was always a strong smell of body odor present in and around the building.
mental health 2

Revised Edition of The Lake Demon Chapter Sixty-Nine


Chapter Sixty-Nine
In a few minutes Winston Stanfield returned with the boys’ coffees.
“I hope you guys like Tim Horton’s coffee with some International Delight creamer,” said Winston.
Garry was the first one to take a sip of his coffee. “Wow, this is delicious, sir. It’s much better than the coffee they give us at the mental health center.”
“What you get there is good old stock institutional coffee. I know. I have some acquaintance with mental health facilities myself. Oh, by the way Garry. You don’t have to call me, ‘sir’. It makes me feel old and much more mature than I actually am. You can call me Winston or just, ‘man’, as far as that goes. We’re pretty informal at my place,” said Winston
“I kind of invited myself over to your house,” said Garry “When Wally told me about your encounter with Ogopogo I wanted to meet you. He also told me that you’re a very cool guy.”
“Well, I do, indeed have an Ogopogo story to tell. The actual encounter with the animal was more, Cody’s, my assistant. He was diving in the lake after I got a digital image of a large object on my radar. The young man got quite a scare down there. He told me that he got a pretty good look at Ogopogo from a distance that was a little too close for his liking. Cody told me that he would never go diving in Lake Okanogan again.”
“Wow, Cody’s lucky. He’s probably one of the few people in the world that had a close up look at Ogopogo,” said Garry.
Winston chuckled at this. “ Oh, I don’t think Cody considered himself to be that lucky. It was more like he was scared out of his wits. There’s likely a lot more people than we can imagine that have seen the lake monster. They don’t report their sightings because they don’t want to be laughed at.”
“Like what happened to you,” said Wally. “You actually lost your job over it.”
“Oh, it wasn’t the only reason they got rid of me, but I don’t want to talk about it right now. Let’s watch some wrestling. It’s just about time for Friday Night Smackdown.”
Picture 45