Category: writer’s block

Excerpt 92 from The Lake Demon by Ken David Stewart


Chapter Ninety-Two
John woke up during the night and couldn’t get back to sleep. He went downstairs to make himself a coffee. He tried to motivate himself to think up some ideas for a new novel that he planned to write.
John walked over to the coffee table to get his pack of Pall Mall cigarettes. Due to his low and unstable income John only bought the budget brand cigarettes. He knew that he should try to beat his tobacco addiction, but he loved to smoke cigarettes when he was working on his writing. John sat in his red leather easy chair that was much the worse for wear. The leather upholstery was wearing out and there were cracks on the chair where some of the stuffing was starting to stick out. John didn’t let the condition of his chair worry him too much. After all he bought it for twenty dollars at a garage sale. He took a cigarette out of the pack and lit it up with his lighter, the one with the Harley Davidson logo. As John glanced at his lighter he thought about how much he would like to have his own Harley Davidson motorcycle.
Right now John would have to settle for finding pictures of Harleys in biker magazines. As he looked at these advertisements John would dream about riding his red custom built Harley along the highway. In his imagination he could see himself with a cigarette dangling from his lips and the wind blowing through his long hair as he passed cars and trucks along the way.
John enjoyed a few minutes of his reverie until he could hear the sound of the coffee percolator. It was now time to face the real world. John didn’t like living in the real world that much. He was happiest when he was living in his own imagination and was sitting at his desk writing his novels. John wanted his next novel to be about Ogopogo.
He was starting to envy the fact that his son, Ryan and his girlfriend, Monique would soon be going on an expedition to search for Ogopogo.
John Richards knew that this was his opportunity to make his dream come true. He often thought about having a close encounter with Ogopogo and proving the creature’s existence once and for all. Heck, if he could gain access to a camcorder he would love to make an amazing video of the creature at close proximity.
John was rather timid and introverted by nature and had never had too many friends due to his being painfully shy. He was also very much a lone wolf by nature. One of the reasons that John chose writing as a career was that he liked to work alone, without a supervisor looking over his shoulder.
This time he knew that he would have to step out of his comfort zone. He needed to be part of the expedition. John especially hated having to call people up and ask for their help. He knew that he would need to just bite the bullet and phone Dean Sanderson.Picture 82 Picture 81

The Writing Process (Part Five) Writer’s Block


How To Break Through Writer’s Block (Part One)
Several times over the last few years I have run into a bad case of what is known as writer’s block. For me writer’s block raises its ugly head when I know I should be working at my word processor but I can’t seem to follow through.
I spend a good part of my day on my PC doing other things so physically getting close to my word processor is not a problem. The question is when will I open up Microsoft Word 2013.
Why do I find it so hard to get started with my writing?
1) I am feeling distracted by noise or other people are near my writing space. I need to let them know that I am going to be starting my work in a few minutes and ask them politely to go to another room or to refrain from disturbing me for the next hour. They are only to disturb me if there’s an emergency situation. I have found that the best solution to this problem is to get up early in the morning and work on my writing when other people in the house are sleeping. Also, I find that I do my best writing in the early hours of the morning.
2) I can’t seem to motivate my fingers to tap the keyboard. I tell myself that I will just check my facebook page for a few minutes. Next I start writing short comments on my friends’ pages or briefly update my status. There, now I’ve warmed up on the keyboard.
3) Sometimes I get overwhelmed by negative thoughts. Something in my head will tell me things such as, “What makes you think you’re a good writer?”
“You’re not smart enough to be a successful novelist.”
“It’s too much work being a writer.”
I have found that these negative thoughts have to be countered with a positive statement. For example:
“I know I’m a good writer because I have almost three hundred regular followers on WordPress.com and I get a lot of “likes” on my posts.”
“My IQ is in the bright normal range. This is sufficient intelligence to be a successful author.
“Learning any new trade or profession requires a great deal of work, but all I need to do is a little bit of writing every day.
(to be continued)

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